DC Primary 2016: Quick Guide to Saturday's GOP Presidential Caucus

Source: AP
Source: AP

Republicans will vote for their choice for the presidential nominee on Saturday during Washington, D.C.'s presidential caucuses. The caucuses will take place at the Loews Madison Hotel, just a 12-minute walk from the White House.

According to the District of Columbia's Republican Party website, the event will take place in the form of a convention and "is the Republican Primary for D.C. Republicans to select the Republican presidential nominee and ultimately a total of 19 delegates and 16 alternate delegates." The convention will be the only time a Republican registered in D.C. can vote for the presidential nominee. 

"In terms of being a D.C. Republican, we have not mattered this much in a presidential primary since Frederick Douglass was a precinct captain here," said Patrick Mara, D.C. GOP executive director, according to the Associated Press

Read more: Everything You Need to Know About How Primaries and Caucuses Actually Work

Twelve candidates will appear on the ballot at the convention, although businessman Donald Trump, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich are the only ones still in the race. 

Voters can arrive from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., although those specific times fell within the hours of the Jewish Sabbath, preventing observant Jews from attending the convention. Orthodox Jews aren't able to vote on the day of rest, so Mara has created extended hours for observant Jews. 

"We don't want to exclude anyone who can't, obviously, vote for religious reasons," Mara told The Washington Post. "We've tried to be as accommodating as possible." 

The only individuals who are allowed to participate in the convention after hours will be registered Republicans who must sign a document stating that they are observant Jews, and all others must vote before 4 p.m. The extended hours will allow voters to participate until 9 pm. 

The Democratic presidential primary will be held on June 14.

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Philip Lewis

Philip Lewis is a programming editor at Mic. He was previously an editorial fellow for 'The Huffington Post'. He can be reached at plewis@mic.com

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