Dudes Are Having 'Dadchelor Parties' 'Cause They're Super Pumped About Parenthood, Bro

Source: Instagram
Source: Instagram

When faced with the emotional tidal wave that is imminent fatherhood, what is a modern man to do?

While the rugged father-to-be of yore may have refrained from fully embracing his girlish excitement around the milestone of parenthood, the woke man of today is totally psyched about becoming a dad. He's so secure in his masculinity, in fact, that he and his bros are throwing straight-up baby showers for each other!

There are just a few small rules:

1. The event must be called a "dadchelor party."

2. Invitations must be written in a block-y, muscular font and include usage of at least five of the following eight "b" words: BEER, BUD, BREW, BOWL (as in football), BALL (as in any sport with a ball), BUFFALO, BARBECUE, BRO. 

3. Only masculine colors like forest green and blue are acceptable (pink is strictly verboten).

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

4. Sneakers are required, ironic dad jeans encouraged.

5. Men love beer, so beer should be incorporated into all aspects of the party, whether in pint glasses, "No. 1 Dad" mugs, baby bottles or just on the front of your actual shirt.

6. Suggested party activities include off-roading, poker-playing and beer (beer!) pong (see No. 5).

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

Dadchelor parties seem to have been around as a baby shower alternative for at least five years now, though they seem to be growing in popularity as of late.

Getting together with your closest friends for a sentimental celebration of a new life chapter, just like women do, while still asserting the fact that you are certainly, for sure, 100%, most definitely still a man?

Guys really can have their beer-themed cake and eat it too!

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

h/t BuzzFeed

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Nicolas DiDomizio

Nicolas DiDomizio is a Staff Connections Writer at Mic. Prior to Mic, he was at MTV for 3 years. He holds a masters from NYU and a bachelors from Western Connecticut State University. Contact him at nic@mic.com.

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