This Plus Size Designer Responded to This Fat-Shaming Ad in the Best Way Possible

This Plus Size Designer Responded to This Fat-Shaming Ad in the Best Way Possible
Source: Facebook
Source: Facebook

You've gotta be pulling our leg. 

Plus-size designer Christina Ashman sent a visual clapback to shopping website Wish after they posted a picture of a model fitting into one leg of a pair of plus-size shorts. 

Here's the advertisement in question:

Source: Wish

After Ashman saw that post, she responded with a flipped version of the picture on the Facebook page for her brand, Interrobang Art & Fashion. In the picture, Ashman puts one of her legs into a petite skirt. 

Source: Facebook

The picture was accompanied with the following message: 

I don't have any formal qualifications in marketing, but if plus size ladies buy shorts based on how one leg looks on a whole petite woman, then maybe smaller ladies will buy skirts based on how the whole thing looks on one pretty thunderous thigh.

"If you're aiming a product at a certain demographic, you should be using an example of that demographic to show how it would actually look on them," Ashman told BuzzFeed. "Plus-size shorts should be shown on two plus-size legs - not a whole petite body inside one leg."

Commenters have been extremely supportive of Ashman. 

Source: Facebook

According to Ashman, even though clothes are made for women in a variety of sizes, only a small range of women are used to advertise those clothes. Ashman is proud to use a variety of women to model her clothes

"Even plus-size brands use the smaller end of the plus scale to sell their clothes, when the whole spectrum are buying them," she told BuzzFeed. "People want to see how clothes will look on their bodies before they buy them." 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

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