February Temperatures Hit "Unprecedented" Record — Right After January Did the Same

February Temperatures Hit "Unprecedented" Record — Right After January Did the Same
Source: AP
Source: AP

For those who didn't notice, February was unusually hot. In fact, in the age of global warming and climate change, the month was so historically warm it shattered NASA global land and ocean temperature records, after the space agency reported a 1.35-degree-Celsius spike in temperatures, when compared to global averages with a baseline from 1951 to 1980.

"This is really quite stunning. ... It's completely unprecedented," Germany's Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Research professor Stefan Rahmstorf told the Sydney Morning Herald Monday. "[This warming] is not harmless. ... It has quite a negative impact on society and the biosphere."

Read more: 7 Global Warming Facts That Even Critics Can't Ignore

That's not all that's on the rise: Other recent data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, showed average carbon dioxide levels on Earth are climbing at an alarming, record rate, having risen by more than 3 parts per million since 2015.

Although man might certainly be a factor in the potentially catastrophic rise in global land and ocean temperatures, the Guardian reported Monday a large El Niño in the Pacific Ocean has brought on warmer climates, though "the temperature smashed records set during the last large El Niño from 1998, which was at least as strong as the current one."

Correction: March 14, 2016
A previous version of this story stated carbon dioxide production on Earth increased 3 parts per million since 2015. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data showed the average carbon dioxide level, as opposed to production or emissions, increased more than 3 parts per million last year.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Chris Riotta

Chris Riotta is a culture reporter at Mic, covering news, music and entertainment. He is based in New York and can be reached at criotta@mic.com

MORE FROM

Hope Hicks reportedly tried to rein Trump in during explosive ‘Times’ interview. It didn’t work.

The low-profile Trump Whisperer is one of the few in the president's orbit to enjoy job security.

Scaramucci once asked Obama if he’d be softer on Wall Street. It didn’t end well.

The exchange came during a CNBC town hall on the financial crisis, two years into Obama’s presidency.

Trump blasts Hilary Clinton, Comey and ‘Amazon Washington Post’ in tweet storm

He also defended Don Jr. and called Democrats "obstructionists" with "no ideas."

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

Hope Hicks reportedly tried to rein Trump in during explosive ‘Times’ interview. It didn’t work.

The low-profile Trump Whisperer is one of the few in the president's orbit to enjoy job security.

Scaramucci once asked Obama if he’d be softer on Wall Street. It didn’t end well.

The exchange came during a CNBC town hall on the financial crisis, two years into Obama’s presidency.

Trump blasts Hilary Clinton, Comey and ‘Amazon Washington Post’ in tweet storm

He also defended Don Jr. and called Democrats "obstructionists" with "no ideas."

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.