'Humans of New York' Creator Denounces Donald Trump's Bigotry in Open Letter

'Humans of New York' Creator Denounces Donald Trump's Bigotry in Open Letter
Source: AP
Source: AP

Brandon Stanton, the man behind the perennially viral Facebook page and photo series Humans of New York, has posted an open letter to the page denouncing Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump and everything he stands for.

In the post, Stanton wrote he tries "my hardest not to be political" and he has "refused to interview several of your fellow candidates. ... But I realize now that there is no correct time to oppose violence and prejudice."

"I've watched you retweet racist images," Stanton continued. "I've watched you retweet racist lies. I've watched you take 48 hours to disavow white supremacy. I've watched you joyfully encourage violence, and promise to 'pay the legal fees' of those who commit violence on your behalf. I've watched you advocate the use of torture and the murder of terrorists' families. I've watched you gleefully tell stories of executing Muslims with bullets dipped in pig blood. I've watched you compare refugees to 'snakes,' and claim that 'Islam hates us.'"

"I am a journalist, Mr. Trump," Stanton added. "And over the last two years I have conducted extensive interviews with hundreds of Muslims. ... And I can confirm — the hateful one is you."

Within an hour of the letter's posting, well over 100,00 people shared Stanton's letter on their Facebook accounts.

Stanton's page, originally focused on profiles of locals throughout New York City's five boroughs, has recently developed an international focus. In December Stanton raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for Syrian refugees featured on his site.

Stanton joins a long list of prominent Americans who have rejected the real estate billionaire's bigoted stances toward Muslims and minorities, including 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Fellow candidates Marco Rubio and John Kasich even recently indicated they may not endorse Trump if he wins the nomination.

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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