The FBI Is Ending Its Court Case Against Apple, AP Reports

The FBI Is Ending Its Court Case Against Apple, AP Reports
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is ending its legal grapple with Apple. The law enforcement agency has found a "mystery" solution to break into the iPhone 5C belonging to a suspected killer in the San Bernardino shooting that left 14 dead, according to the Associated Press.  

That means it no longer needs Apple to create software to disable certain security functions in iOS 9. 

FBI's court case with the iPhone maker is effectively over. Federal officials are likely to withdraw the case, USA Today has reported, citing government officials.

The announcement comes after much debate around privacy, computer law and how much ready access government officials should have to personal devices, where many tech notables weighed in. At an Apple event last week, Tim Cook gave what may be a final word on the issue, at least for now: "We need to decide as a nation how much power the government should have over our data and over our privacy."

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Ruth Reader

Ruth is a senior staff writer covering innovative technology and the people behind it. Send through pitches and tips to ruth@mic.com.

MORE FROM

The six words that will make you sound smarter than all your friends when watching the eclipse

What is an umbra? How does the Saros cycle work? The total solar eclipse, explained.

Do you have little freckles in your eyes? This might be why.

Remember to protect your eyes.

The US desperately needs computer science majors, so keep coding

There are more than 500,000 computing jobs open in the US right now.

The 2017 solar eclipse will help scientists figure out just how much energy we get from the sun

Reflections are tricky things — as we'll learn when August's total solar eclipse hits.

No, Mars didn’t grow 12 more moons — here’s what’s happening in this stunning picture

Mars and the mysteriously multiplying moon.

Scooby-Doo’s real name isn’t Scoobert Doobert

It's time to call Scooby by his real name.

The six words that will make you sound smarter than all your friends when watching the eclipse

What is an umbra? How does the Saros cycle work? The total solar eclipse, explained.

Do you have little freckles in your eyes? This might be why.

Remember to protect your eyes.

The US desperately needs computer science majors, so keep coding

There are more than 500,000 computing jobs open in the US right now.

The 2017 solar eclipse will help scientists figure out just how much energy we get from the sun

Reflections are tricky things — as we'll learn when August's total solar eclipse hits.

No, Mars didn’t grow 12 more moons — here’s what’s happening in this stunning picture

Mars and the mysteriously multiplying moon.

Scooby-Doo’s real name isn’t Scoobert Doobert

It's time to call Scooby by his real name.