If You Like to Sleep In, You Might Finally Have an Excuse — It's Genetic

If You Like to Sleep In, You Might Finally Have an Excuse — It's Genetic
Source: Unsplash
Source: Unsplash

The early bird shouldn't be the only one said to catch the worm. According to research on chronobiology, or the science that says everyone has a different internal clock that regulates sleep, about 40% of the population actually doesn't run on the standard 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. sleep schedule, Vox reported.

Our chronotypes are likely rooted in genetics, and having a sleep pattern that is at odds with it can actually affect people's health and performance, giving them a sort of "social jet lag," New York Times Magazine reported in 2013. So it might be time to give those night owls with delayed sleep phases a break from the stigma of being lazy or late-night partiers.

For these folks, coffee and stimulants don't help them stay alert and focused in the mornings. 

"People have mocked me for it, saying how lazy I am, that I'm not trying hard enough, and that really bothers me, because it's not my fault," Cassidy Solokis, a student at Northern Arizona University, told Vox. "I'm really, really trying, and it's just not working."

Read more: What Sleep Deprivation Does to Your Brain, in One Stunning Infographic

Being off-schedule with their chronotype can contribute to someone becoming obese, stressed or depressed, New York Times Magazine reported. 

Some people are advocating for awareness and acceptance of later sleep schedules, one being Camilla Kring and her group B-society. She said she believes more companies should be accommodating by allowing workers more flexible schedules and incorporating small changes, such as later meetings, according to Vox.

"Just by changing your schedule by an hour or two, it can result in having more sleep, higher productivity," she told Vox

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Kathleen Wong

Kathleen is a branded content staff writer at Mic. She is based in New York and can be reached at kathleen@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Driver charged with human trafficking after 30-40 people found locked in fatally hot tractor-trailer

The charge against James Matthew Bradley, the alleged driver of the vehicle, could carry a punishment as severe as the death penalty.

Charlie Gard’s parents end legal fight to continue treatment for terminally ill son

The parents have withdrawn their request for Charlie to receive treatment in the U.S.

10th person dies after 38 found locked in sweltering tractor-trailer outside Texas Walmart

8 were found dead at the scene; 2 more died after being rushed to the hospital in critical or serious condition.

Dozens killed in deadly car bomb attack in Kabul

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the deadly attack.

‘Hot Mic’ podcast: Democratic brand, WH Communications Director, Jared Kushner to be questioned

Here are the important stories to know for Monday, July 24

New White House communications director Scaramucci says press briefings should be on-camera

If the new White House communications director gets his way, the press briefings could soon be recorded once again.

Driver charged with human trafficking after 30-40 people found locked in fatally hot tractor-trailer

The charge against James Matthew Bradley, the alleged driver of the vehicle, could carry a punishment as severe as the death penalty.

Charlie Gard’s parents end legal fight to continue treatment for terminally ill son

The parents have withdrawn their request for Charlie to receive treatment in the U.S.

10th person dies after 38 found locked in sweltering tractor-trailer outside Texas Walmart

8 were found dead at the scene; 2 more died after being rushed to the hospital in critical or serious condition.

Dozens killed in deadly car bomb attack in Kabul

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the deadly attack.

‘Hot Mic’ podcast: Democratic brand, WH Communications Director, Jared Kushner to be questioned

Here are the important stories to know for Monday, July 24

New White House communications director Scaramucci says press briefings should be on-camera

If the new White House communications director gets his way, the press briefings could soon be recorded once again.