Muslim Student in Texas Says a Teacher Called Him a "Terrorist"

Source: KHOU
Source: KHOU

The family of 12-year-old Sugar Land, Texas, student Waleed Abushaaban is asking for a teacher to be fired for allegedly calling their son a "terrorist."

Local news station KHOU reported Abushaaban, a Muslim American seventh-grader at First Colony Middle School, said the unnamed teacher dropped the T-word on Thursday while his class was watching Bend It Like Beckham, a 2002 movie about a Sikh girl from London who plays soccer despite her family's objections.

"We're in the class watching a movie," Abushaaban told KHOU. "And I was just laughing at the movie and the teacher said, 'I wouldn't be laughing if I was you.' And I said, 'Why?' She said, 'Because we all think you're a terrorist.'"

"[Other students] were like, 'Oh, I see a bomb!' and they started all laughing and making jokes," he continued. "I was upset and I felt like I was put in the corner and like everybody was just looking at me."

In a statement, the school said the staff member in question was a "probationary teacher" who has since been placed on administrative leave.

KHOU reported the statement continued:

While the teacher reports her statements were made in the context of trying to make a point about negative stereotypes, district officials do not believe that the teacher exercised the appropriate sensitivity expected of the district's educators, and do not believe that the statements were made in a manner that is in keeping with the district's core beliefs and commitments.

In 2015 another Texas public school drew similar attention when officials at Irving's MacArthur High School summoned police to arrest Ahmed Mohamed, a 14-year-old student who had brought a homemade clock to school. Mohamed was arrested and sent to jail "for his safety and for the safety of the officers," reported the Dallas Morning News. It was a reaction President Barack Obama seemingly deemed unjust enough to later invite Mohamed to the White House.

Watch the video below:

Source: YouTube

h/t BuzzFeed News

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

MORE FROM

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.