Tax Day 2016 Extension: How to Get More Time on Your Taxes When You Just Can't Be Bothered

Source: AP
Source: AP

Every year, people scramble to find their W-2s and the nearest accountant in order to file their federal and state taxes by April 15. However, tax day 2016 (as well as the next two years) will be a little later than usual. The typical April 15 deadline has been moved to the following Monday, April 18 because the holiday, Emancipation Day falls on Saturday, April 16, but will be observed in Washington, D.C., on the preceding business day.

For 2017 and 2018, tax day will also be later because April 15 will fall on a weekend (i.e., a non-business day).

If for some reason, this year's extra three days isn't sufficient, you do have options. Unfortunately, said options also involve filling out a bunch of forms.

Read more: There's One Thing You Need to Know When Filing Your Taxes

Source: Giphy

According to the IRS' official website, most individuals can file a tax extension by filling out Form 4868. If you are in the military, serving in a combat zone or "qualified hazardous duty" area, or if you're living overseas, special rules may apply to you.

Regardless, you must file the extension by April 18 (unless you live in Maine or Massachusetts, in which case you have yet another day, with a deadline of April 19). Luckily, filing for an extension can be done online.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Andrew Leung

Andrew was an editorial fellow at Mic. He is based in New York and can be reached at aleungnyc@gmail.com

MORE FROM

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

American Health Care Act by the numbers: What to know about Senate Republicans' secret health plan

After drafting the ACA repeal and replace plan behind closed doors, the AHCA is out — and Senate Republican leaders are hoping to vote on it in a week.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

American Health Care Act by the numbers: What to know about Senate Republicans' secret health plan

After drafting the ACA repeal and replace plan behind closed doors, the AHCA is out — and Senate Republican leaders are hoping to vote on it in a week.