Facebook Is Hiding Your Messages From You AGAIN — Here's How to Uncover Them

Facebook Is Hiding Your Messages From You AGAIN — Here's How to Uncover Them
Source: AP
Source: AP

A secret folder full of notes. A giant media conglomerate with something to hide. No, it's not the plot to an international spy thriller — it's just Facebook burying your messages from 2013.

That was the year Facebook users realized, in part thanks to a blog post by David Pogue for the New York Times, that their missives were being filed to the little-known "other" folder, unbeknownst to them. Pogue wrote when he checked out his own hidden folder, he found that it was "teeming with messages, many of them now ancient and irrelevant, that would have been very important to me if I'd known they existed."

Fast forward to today, when Facebook users are having déjà vu. According to Cosmopolitan, there's another secret stash of messages that the site seems to automatically filter as spam, making it extremely unlikely that they'll ever see the light of day — until now.

Here's a step-by-step guide to see how to access this hidden treasure trove, and prepare yourself for the mysteries that await.

1. Open Facebook's desktop site and click on your messages.

2. Click on 'Message Requests.'

3. HERE IT COMES: Click on 'See filtered requests.'

4. Feast your eyes on the wealth of spam, money wiring scams and unwanted sexual advances you never knew existed! 

Happy searching!

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Brianna Provenzano

Brianna is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. Send tips/inquiries to brianna@mic.com.

MORE FROM

An everyday cooking spice may help fight the most common type of cancer found in infants

Children normally suffer health risks from chemo or other forms of cancer treatment, but this spice could help.

Facebook is rumored to be working on a smart speaker — here’s everything we know

Imagine a world where you can hear your Facebook comments on your smart speaker.

There’s now a cochlear implant processor made to work with your iPhone

It's allegedly the first in the world of its kind.

Scientists edited mice brains so that they live longer — and humans could be next

Scientists managed to extend mouse life spans by up to 15%.

You’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse from ridiculous heights, thanks to these balloons

Watch the eclipse live, anywhere, as if you're in space.

Scientists say you should play video games on your breaks at work

Somebody file an expense report for an Xbox, pronto.

An everyday cooking spice may help fight the most common type of cancer found in infants

Children normally suffer health risks from chemo or other forms of cancer treatment, but this spice could help.

Facebook is rumored to be working on a smart speaker — here’s everything we know

Imagine a world where you can hear your Facebook comments on your smart speaker.

There’s now a cochlear implant processor made to work with your iPhone

It's allegedly the first in the world of its kind.

Scientists edited mice brains so that they live longer — and humans could be next

Scientists managed to extend mouse life spans by up to 15%.

You’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse from ridiculous heights, thanks to these balloons

Watch the eclipse live, anywhere, as if you're in space.

Scientists say you should play video games on your breaks at work

Somebody file an expense report for an Xbox, pronto.