17 Jaw-Dropping Photos of Space That Show Us Just How Small We Really Are

17 Jaw-Dropping Photos of Space That Show Us Just How Small We Really Are
Source: NASA
Source: NASA

It's a big universe out there, and we're just some little critters scurrying around on a rock as it hurtles through space — the only thing that stands between us and the infinite realms of outer space is a delicate bubble of atmosphere. Fun! Here are some photos of space that really capture that stomach-swooping feeling of tininess.

Read more: NASA Is About to Light the Biggest Human-Made Space Fire Ever

This photo of the moon and Earth taken from the International Space Station.

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A dwarf galaxy, about 11 million light-years away from us.

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Earth as seen from the moon in 1968.

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A cluster of stars, 20,000 light-years away from Earth.

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The first flower grown in the International Space Station, photographed by astronaut Scott Kelly.

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Saturn, seen through an infared filter.

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These visible "loops" on the surface of the sun can reach up to 15 times the diameter of Earth in height.

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The Northen Lights just North of Chicago, viewed from the International Space Station.

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The Quintuplet Cluster, located 100 light-years from the center of our galaxy.

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Pluto and one of its moons, Charon.

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The Great Pyramids of Giza, seen from space.

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Astronaut Bruce McCandless maneuvering, untethered, above Earth in 1984.

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Galaxy NGC 6240, 400 million light-years away from Earth.

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Palomar 12, a cluster of stars on the outskirts of the Milky Way.


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The remnants of an exploded star.

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New York City, seen from the International Space Station.

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The remains of a supernova whose explosion may have been seen almost 2,000 years ago by Chinese astronomers.

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Anna Swartz

Anna is a staff writer for Mic covering breaking news. She can be reached at aswartz@mic.com.

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