This Is Why White Affluent Young Men Vote Donald Trump, In Their Own Words

This Is Why White Affluent Young Men Vote Donald Trump, In Their Own Words
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

They've got money to burn and a vote to cast — they are the young white men with money who vote for Donald Trump

In a new video released by CBS News, young, mostly white men — "Trump bros," the network calls them — who support the Republican presidential candidate and business mogul told the outlet why exactly the billionaire has their support. 

At a Trump rally in Bloomington, Illinois, CBS spoke to Ryan Poland, who wore head-to-toe Trump and America gear, including America-themed Nikes. 

"I like Trump because he speaks the truth," Poland said.

CBS News captured a series of reactions when several "Trump bros" explained to them in short sentiments why Trump earned their vote. 

"He's got spine," one said. 

"I think money attracts money," another said. "And that's why I like Trump."

"I think America needs doers in the country — not just talkers — doers," a third supporter told CBS News. 

And yet another said, "He does him. Doesn't pretend to be anyone else, he does him."

Grant Sandberg, a high school senior who wore a suit and baseball cap to emulate Trump, said to CBS News, "We're not afraid to show that we enjoy being Americans, and Trump portrays being a good American." 

Trump's history of sexism — comments about women who get abortions, a comment about Megyn Kelly's period — doesn't really phase the Trump bro, either. 

"Misogyny was an issue about maybe 60, 80 years ago," 18-year-old Jack Rowe said to CBS News. "That's not an issue today. There are a lot bigger fish to fry ... You know, ISIS is chopping off heads. We've got $19 trillion in debt."

David Portnoy, founder of Barstool Sports, a fratty sports website, said that Trump's support is all about anxiety over political correctness. 

"There is a sentiment among frat guys, lacrosse players and middle class affluent white kids that they are kind of getting persecuted lately," Portnoy told CBS News. "You gotta walk on eggshells. There's kind of that feeling, and Trump, he tells a joke and doesn't back down. He says things that would normally been frowned upon. At a school, a kid would get expelled." 

He added, "Not that it's right or wrong, but he's sort of defending a lot of the things they've been attacked for in the last five years or so."

h/t CBS News 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

MORE FROM

The 5 major people Donald Trump fired since taking office

Reince Priebus is just the latest high-profile person to be fired by Trump.

How brands battle for creativity and authenticity

In the age of call-out culture and brand boycotts, how can brands get it right the first time?

While You Weren’t Looking: 5 stories free from “skinny repeals” and the Mooch’s “colorful language”

Five stories you may have missed while trying to keep up with a chaotic news week.

In the shadow of Brooklyn’s luxury apartments, “canners” form a tight-knit community

For many lower income people in New York City, canning can be a safe and legal way to earn a living.

A Steve Bannon propagandist is turning the alt-right’s antihero Based Stick Man into a comic book

"We’re never going to change the culture from Washington. We’re going to do it from comics, from movies.”

NBC News chief wanted to dial back MSNBC's liberal identity. Then Trump got elected.

Some insiders say MSNBC is having an identity crisis — but the channel is having its best ratings year ever.

The 5 major people Donald Trump fired since taking office

Reince Priebus is just the latest high-profile person to be fired by Trump.

How brands battle for creativity and authenticity

In the age of call-out culture and brand boycotts, how can brands get it right the first time?

While You Weren’t Looking: 5 stories free from “skinny repeals” and the Mooch’s “colorful language”

Five stories you may have missed while trying to keep up with a chaotic news week.

In the shadow of Brooklyn’s luxury apartments, “canners” form a tight-knit community

For many lower income people in New York City, canning can be a safe and legal way to earn a living.

A Steve Bannon propagandist is turning the alt-right’s antihero Based Stick Man into a comic book

"We’re never going to change the culture from Washington. We’re going to do it from comics, from movies.”

NBC News chief wanted to dial back MSNBC's liberal identity. Then Trump got elected.

Some insiders say MSNBC is having an identity crisis — but the channel is having its best ratings year ever.