UC Davis Paid at Least $175,000 to Erase Pepper Spray Incident From the Internet

Source: AP
Source: AP

In 2011, University of California, Davis police pepper sprayed a group of protesters during a peaceful Occupy movement protest. The image of the police pepper spraying the protestors quickly went viral. However, university administrators apparently would like nothing more than to forget the incident ever happened.

According to the Sacramento Bee, the university has spent at least $175,000 in the hopes that consulting companies can help remove negative images and references about the school and Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi from the internet, in order to rebuild UC Davis's reputation.

"We have worked to ensure that the reputation of the university, which the chancellor leads, is fairly portrayed," UC Davis spokeswoman Dana Topousis told the Sacramento Bee. "We wanted to promote and advance the important teaching, research and public service done by our students, faculty and staff, which is the core mission of our university."

The details on two contracts were revealed this week: In 2013, UC Davis drafted a proposal with Nevins & Associates, a public relations firm in Maryland, for a six-month contract. In 2014, marketing agency IDMLOCO was tasked to "design and execute a comprehensive search engine results management strategy" for $82,500.

"Nevins & Associates is prepared to create and execute an online branding campaign designed to clean up the negative attention the University of California, Davis and Chancellor Katehi have received related to the events that transpired in November 2011," the proposal with Nevins & Associates stated. 


Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/article71659992.html#storylink=cpy

Read more: 'The O'Reilly Factor' Tackles Why College Students Are Such "Sensitive Individuals"


Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/article71659992.html#storylink=cpy

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Philip Lewis

Philip Lewis is a programming editor at Mic. He was previously an editorial fellow for 'The Huffington Post'. He can be reached at plewis@mic.com

MORE FROM

New York politicians used NYC Pride to stand with LGBTQ people in their fight against oppression

Politicians used 2017 New York City Pride to assure LGBTQ people that they would stand for their rights.

Car slams into Eid celebrants in UK, injuring 6; police say terrorism isn't suspected

Police say they believe an Eid celebrant was behind the wheel of the car that injured six outside a mosque.

Oil truck explodes in Pakistan, killing at least 153

The deadly fire broke out as residents rushed to collect the leaking oil from the overturned tanker.

Will Justice Anthony Kennedy retire at end of Supreme Court term? Here's what we know.

Rumors that the 80-year-old swing justice may leave the bench are fueling fear of a second Trump pick on the nation's high court.

3 states and D.C. allow same flammable building materials behind Grenfell Tower fire

The causes of London's Grenfell Tower are similar to the justifications used to waive fire regulations in the U.S.

New Jersey bill would require kids to be taught how to interact with police

Students from kindergarten through 12th grade would receive the education.

New York politicians used NYC Pride to stand with LGBTQ people in their fight against oppression

Politicians used 2017 New York City Pride to assure LGBTQ people that they would stand for their rights.

Car slams into Eid celebrants in UK, injuring 6; police say terrorism isn't suspected

Police say they believe an Eid celebrant was behind the wheel of the car that injured six outside a mosque.

Oil truck explodes in Pakistan, killing at least 153

The deadly fire broke out as residents rushed to collect the leaking oil from the overturned tanker.

Will Justice Anthony Kennedy retire at end of Supreme Court term? Here's what we know.

Rumors that the 80-year-old swing justice may leave the bench are fueling fear of a second Trump pick on the nation's high court.

3 states and D.C. allow same flammable building materials behind Grenfell Tower fire

The causes of London's Grenfell Tower are similar to the justifications used to waive fire regulations in the U.S.

New Jersey bill would require kids to be taught how to interact with police

Students from kindergarten through 12th grade would receive the education.