Daisy Ridley of 'Star Wars' Has a Powerful Message About Self-Esteem and Social Media

Source: Instagram
Source: Instagram

For all those perfectly coiffed, makeup-caked, airbrushed social media posts by people who profess to have just woken up, Star Wars' leading lady Daisy Ridley has a response. Ridley used Instagram on Monday night to send out a powerful message about social media, self-esteem and how the two relate to each other. "I woke up like this #NoFilter #NoMakeup," the star wrote across a photo of herself, which clearly featured a filter, makeup and someone who looked very awake. 

Read more: Daisy Ridley Has a Must-Read Message for the Troll Who Body Shamed Her on Instagram

Her comment for the photo, however, told a very different story: "Three of these statements aren't true... Social media is great but also a bit scary 'cause what people post is the most filtered, most carefully chosen and cleverly edited moments of their lives," Ridley wrote. "And self esteem is a huge issue for people around the world."

Source: Instagram

The images we share of ourselves on social media are highly curated, she argued, which means that proclamations of authenticity are never really true — even the selection of the picture itself is its own kind of self-censorship. She continued,

My skin isn't great so I don't post no make up selfies, much as I'd like to; I have a trainer urging me on in workouts and don't include all the times I say, "I can't do it," and I don't smile all the time but I like to share the pictures where I am. But I actually do love myself, I try to think good thoughts always and am surrounded by the most wonderful people, so I'm keeping it balanced (like the Force, obvs). Just thought I'd say :)

Ridley has a history of using the forces of social media for good. On March 9, she used Instagram to respond to a meme which body-shamed her for being too thin. 

Source: Giphy

"I'm a normal girl thrust into extraordinary circumstances, just like Rey," Ridley shared. "I will not apologize for how I look, what I say and how I live my life 'cause what's happening inside is much more important anyway and I am striving to be the best version of myself, even if I stumble along the way."

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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