Republicans Are Burning Their Voter ID Cards in Protest of a Donald Trump Nomination

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

And it all goes up in smoke. After Ted Cruz suspended his campaign for U.S. president following his loss of the Indiana primary, the Republican party's presumptive nominee became Donald Trump — much to the chagrin of its voters, many of whom took to social media to declare their secession from the GOP. As BuzzFeed reported, the looming Trump candidacy prompted some ex-Republicans to set their voter identification cards on fire.

It's a pretty strong statement, given the importance many in the GOP have heaped upon implementing tighter regulations on voter registration and voters IDs. 

And some dissatisfied constituents may still do that, just not as Republicans. Many simply unregistered themselves from the GOP, opting instead for "no party affiliation" or the Constitution Party.

Meanwhile, as the GOP panics, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton is putting more distance between herself and Trump. Poll results released Wednesday morning put her at 54% voter support versus Trump's 41%. The general mood of the Republican party seems grim — but hey, there's always John Kasich.

Source: Giphy

Read more: Watch Ted Cruz Punch — And Then Elbow — Wife Heidi Cruz in the Face

h/t BuzzFeed

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Claire Lampen

Claire is a staff writer at Mic who covers women's issues and reproductive rights. She is based in New York and can be reached at claire@mic.com.

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