Pregnant Woman Says She Was Fired After Being Told 'Pregnancy Is Not Part of the Uniform'

Pregnant Woman Says She Was Fired After Being Told 'Pregnancy Is Not Part of the Uniform'
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

A woman has filed a lawsuit against Procter and Gamble, alleging that the company fired her four months into her pregnancy after failing to make minor adjustments to accommodate her condition.

Tiffany Kantrowitz was initially hired to work at the Fifth Avenue location of Dolce and Gabbana, a P&G-owned brand, as a makeup salesperson. Kantrowitz believed that the position represented a "big break for me, a company that would develop me and I could move up with," she told ThinkProgress.

Kantrowitz says she mentioned to a manager that she was interested in becoming pregnant one day, to which she alleges the manager responded, "Pregnancy is not part of the uniform." Kantrowitz did, in fact, become pregnant toward the end of 2014.

Despite being determined not to let her symptoms, like the chronic headaches and nausea she suffered in her first trimester, affect her work, Kantrowitz told ThinkProgress that her managers issued her a written warning for sitting down on a stool while battling dizziness during an interaction with a customer.

HR representatives eventually intervened and told Kantrowitz she was permitted to take 5-to-10-minute breaks in difficult-to-access break rooms on a separate floor from where she was working, which she says made it more difficult to hit her sales quotas.

The company also insisted that any break time she took come out of her 12 weeks of paid family leave.

Four months into her pregnancy, Kantrowitz was fired. In a statement, the company said that its discovery of "tester products" among her possessions led to the decision.

"Ms. Kantrowitz was terminated for cause following an internal investigation," a spokesperson for P&G told ThinkProgress, adding, "P&G has been, and continues to be widely respected for our commitment to diversity and inclusion and the many programs we have in place to support working mothers."

In her lawsuit, Kantrowitz claims that other employees frequently tested out products without consequence, and that she was unfairly singled out "in retaliation for [her] insistence on her right to a reasonable accommodation for her pregnancy."

According to a Pew Research Center study, more women than ever are working during pregnancy, and 82% of respondents said that they were willing to work until within a month of giving birth. However, many states still do not offer pregnant women adequate protection against discrimination — leaving them vulnerable to similar treatment.

"I'm still kind of surprised that it happened to me," Kantrowitz said. "It's disappointing in our day and age that people would be unsympathetic to a pregnant woman in the workplace."

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Brianna Provenzano

Brianna is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. Send tips/inquiries to brianna@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Six months after the Women’s March on Washington, the Resistance Revival has a message for Trump

"Well I/ Went down to the White House and I/ Took back what they stole from me," the Resistance Revival Chorus sang in a Times Square flash mob last weekend.

20 attorneys general write letter urging Betsy DeVos to keep sexual assault protections

The attorneys general reminded DeVos that scrapping Title IX guidance will have a chilling effect on sexual assault and rape reporting rates.

New study suggests high workloads and aging doctor population means looming OB-GYN shortage

Obstetricians and gynecologists are overworked at nearing retirement age — without a younger contingent to replace them.

Why pro-life doctors want the First Amendment to protect their right to lie to patients

Crisis pregnancy centers believe they should be exempt from a law saying they should inform patients about all their medical options, including abortions.

‘Brown Girls’ wants to tell women of color’s stories in all their messy, complicated glory

Creators Fatimah Asghar and Sam Bailey want to let their characters break free of the neat identity categories people are wont to place them in.

One woman living in R Kelly’s alleged “sex cult” says everything is fine. That doesn’t mean it is.

Jocelyn Savage says she's "happy" and "totally fine" in her arrangement with R. Kelly. Experts say that's common behavior among abuse survivors.

Six months after the Women’s March on Washington, the Resistance Revival has a message for Trump

"Well I/ Went down to the White House and I/ Took back what they stole from me," the Resistance Revival Chorus sang in a Times Square flash mob last weekend.

20 attorneys general write letter urging Betsy DeVos to keep sexual assault protections

The attorneys general reminded DeVos that scrapping Title IX guidance will have a chilling effect on sexual assault and rape reporting rates.

New study suggests high workloads and aging doctor population means looming OB-GYN shortage

Obstetricians and gynecologists are overworked at nearing retirement age — without a younger contingent to replace them.

Why pro-life doctors want the First Amendment to protect their right to lie to patients

Crisis pregnancy centers believe they should be exempt from a law saying they should inform patients about all their medical options, including abortions.

‘Brown Girls’ wants to tell women of color’s stories in all their messy, complicated glory

Creators Fatimah Asghar and Sam Bailey want to let their characters break free of the neat identity categories people are wont to place them in.

One woman living in R Kelly’s alleged “sex cult” says everything is fine. That doesn’t mean it is.

Jocelyn Savage says she's "happy" and "totally fine" in her arrangement with R. Kelly. Experts say that's common behavior among abuse survivors.