You've Been Making Ice Cubes Wrong Your Entire Life

It's happened to the best of us: You're hosting cocktails at your place in an hour and you realize you forgot to refill the ice trays. 

Exhale. The next time this happens, know that you're not totally screwed. The good news is, there's a speedier way to get ice cubes to freeze. 

Here's what you need to do. 

1. Fill your ice trays with hot water. 

2. Put them in the freezer. 

3. Wait. 

Your ice will be prepared more quickly than it would have had you used cold or lukewarm water. 

Why? Science. 

Specifically the Mpemba Effect, which explains why hot water freezers more quickly than cold water. If you want to know what happens to cause hot water to freeze faster, head here

You'll still have to wait some time for the ice to freeze, but while you do, you can enlighten all of your guests about water's amazing properties. Best party ever!

Cheers! Now you're good to pour yourself a nice cold drink — on the rocks, of course. 

Source: Giphy/Giphy

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Kate Bratskeir

Kate Bratskeir is a Food Editor at Mic. She can be reached at kate@mic.com.

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