George R.R. Martin Releases New Chapter of 'The Winds of Winter,' Fans Can Rejoice

George R.R. Martin Releases New Chapter of 'The Winds of Winter,' Fans Can Rejoice
Source: AP
Source: AP

Fans are still unsure when the sixth book in George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, The Winds of Winter, will be released — all the more frustrating when HBO's adaptation has surpassed the book's' narrative in the latest season. However, there are glimmers of hope that its release, like winter, is coming soon. Martin posted a new sample chapter on his website on Tuesday, following Arianne Martell

(Editor's Note: Game of Thrones Season six spoilers ahead!)

Now, for Game of Thrones TV watchers, if that name doesn't ring a bell, you're not getting all your Martells mixed up. The daughter of Doran Martell, Arianne has yet to appear on the show, and it seems likely she might never make it on-screen after her father and brother were abruptly killed by Ellaria Sand and the Sand Snakes in the season six premiere. 

Source: YouTube

But unlike the show, which has been maligned for its portrayal of the Dorne storyline, Martin has a lot in store for the Martells. 

"You want to know what the Sand Snakes, Prince Doran, Areo Hotah, Ellaria Sand, Darkstar, and the rest will be up to in Winds of Winter?" Martin wrote in an accompanying blog post on Tuesday. "Quite a lot, actually. The sample will give you a taste. For the rest, you will need to wait." 

Of course, optimistic fans will expect this means The Winds of Winter is coming out sooner rather than later, and could be true, given the initial plan was to release the book by the end of 2015. Not to mention, he's released sample chapters before. However, in anticipation of fans and the media speculation, Martin made sure to quell those suggestions emphatically. 

"And no, just to spike any bullshit rumors, changing the sample chapter does not mean I am done," Martin wrote. 

Read more: When Is the Next 'Game of Thrones' Book Coming Out?

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Miles Surrey

Miles is a staff writer at Mic, covering culture. He is based in New York and can be reached at miles@mic.com.

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