The US Is $1.44 Trillion Short on Infrastructure Needs — Enjoy Your Crumbling Country

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

The United States is falling to literal pieces.

According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, the country is spending $1.44 trillion below what it needs to keep U.S. infrastructure up and running.

The ASCE estimated of the $3.32 trillion needed to keep things running up to speed, only $1.88 trillion is being spent through 2025, Reuters reported. In addition to that, problems left unsolved would compound on each other, so kicking the can down the road would leave us $5.18 trillion in the hole by 2040.

Read more: The Bizarre Thing Baffling Amazon Users About This Toy Fighter Jet

"America is currently spending more failing to act on its infrastructure gap than it would to close it," Greg DiLoreto, a former president of ASCE, told Reuters.  

Source: Mic/Pixabay

The consequences of the United States' failing infrastructure take a toll on all Americans — and for that matter, any human who happens to be in the country.

According to the report, every American home will lose $3,400 each year, as a result of such deficiencies, through 2025.

Infrastructure failings can also have far more immediate impacts on ordinary life, including bridge collapses and never-ending public works projects like New York City's Second Avenue Subway. Delays and the overcall decrepitude of LaGuardia Airport are so bad, Republican presumptive presidential nominee Donald Trump has called it out publicly on the campaign trail. 

"You land at LaGuardia ... or Newark or LAX and you walk into a filthy terminal that are falling apart and you have broken terrazzo floors and that's all you have," Trump said during a rally in New Hampshire in September, the Hill reported. "We have 60% of our bridges are in danger. We have roadways that are coming part. We have airports that are Third World. ... We have to rebuild our own country."  

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Jon Levine

Jon Levine is a staff writer at Mic, covering politics and people. He is based in New York and can be reached at JLevine@mic.com.

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