Joe Biden Cries During DNC Speech: Was It Real or Fake

It's official, Joe Biden is the nominee for reelection of Vice President of the United States of America. Biden gave a rousing and emotional speech that, however, was sober and low key and didn't threaten with upstaging the following speech by President Barack Obama. 

Towards the end of the speech, however, Vice President Biden addressed the war in Afghanistan as well as our fallen heroes during conflict. Then he did it. The vice president sobbed, then cried. Was it heartfelt and real, or part of an carefully designed performance?

Here are Joe Biden's full remarks to the DNC Convention on Thursday, ahead of President Obama's prime-time speech on Night 3 of the Convention:

1) On the Obama-Biden relationship

Barack and I have been through a lot together. And we’ve learned a lot about each other. I learned of the enormity of his heart. And he learned of the depth of my loyalty. And there was another thing that bound us. We both had a pretty good idea what these families were going through--in part because our own families had gone through similar struggles.

2) On Obama's character

"I can remember the day that my dad sat at the end of my bed, and said, things are going to be tough for a while. I have to go to Delaware to get a new job. But it's going to be better for us. The rest of my life, my dad never failed to remind me--that a job is about a lot more than a paycheck. It’s about dignity. It’s about respect. It’s about being able to look your children in the eye—and say honey, it’s going to be okay, and believe it was going to be okay. When Barack and I were growing up, there was an implicit understanding. If you took responsibility, you’d get a fair shot at a better deal.  The values behind that deal--were the values that shaped us both. And today, they are Barack’s guiding star.

Folks, I’ve watched him. He never wavers. He steps up. He asks the same thing over and over again: How is this going to work for ordinary families? Will it help them?"

3) On the auto bailout

"When I look back now on the President’s decision, I also think of another son of an automobile man--Mitt Romney. Mitt Romney grew up in Detroit.  His father ran American Motors. Yet he was willing to let Detroit go bankrupt. It’s not that he’s a bad guy. I’m sure he grew up loving cars as much as I did.  I just don’t think he understood—I just don’t think he understood what saving the automobile industry meant-to all of America. I think he saw it the Bain way. Balance sheets. Write-offs.

Folks, the Bain way may bring your firm the highest profit. But it’s not the way to lead your country from its highest office. 

4) On foreign policy

We sat for days in the Situation Room. He listened to the risks and reservations about the raid.And he asked the tough questions. But when Admiral McRaven looked him in the eye and said, “Sir, we can get this done,” I knew at that moment Barack had made his decision. His response was decisive. He said do it. And justice was done.

But Governor Romney didn’t see things that way. When he was asked about bin Laden in 2007, he said, and I quote, “it’s not worth moving heaven and earth, and spending billions of dollars, just trying to catch one person.”

He was wrong. If you understood that America’s heart had to be healed, you would have done exactly what the President did. And you too would have moved heaven and earth--to hunt down bin Laden, and bring him to justice.

5) On the American Dream

"You never quit on America. And you deserve a President who will never quit on you. And one more thing that our opponents are dead wrong about: America is NOT in decline.

I’ve got news for Governor Romney and Congressman Ryan, it has never, never, ever, been a good bet to bet against the American people.

My fellow Americans, America is coming back and we’re not going back!  And we have no intention of downsizing the American Dream."