Smartphone Addiction Is Now Interfering With People's Sex Lives

Smartphone Addiction Is Now Interfering With People's Sex Lives
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

First let us take a moment to pour one for the good old days, in which smartphones didn't exist, mental clarity was sometimes attainable and people actually paid attention to their lives throughout the day.

Okay, now that we've gotten that out of the way, let's discuss this new study from the University of Virginia and the University of British Columbia, which says that the unrelenting buzz of our smartphone notifications "may be causing ADHD-like symptoms even among the general population." LOL. Sad face. Lemon emoji. Wait — what were we talking about, again?

From a University of Virginia press release:

221 students at the University of British Columbia drawn from the general student population were assigned for one week to maximize phone interruptions by keeping notification alerts on, and their phones within easy reach. During another week participants were assigned to minimize phone interruptions by keeping alerts off and their phones away. At the end of each week, participants completed questionnaires assessing inattention and hyperactivity. The results showed that the participants experienced significantly higher levels of inattention and hyperactivity when alerts were turned on.

The study also dug up some past research which previously deduced that "as many as 95% of smartphone users have used their phones during social gatherings; that seven in 10 people used their phones while working; and one in 10 admitted to checking their phones during sex."

Please note that checking the phone during sex is both unsexy and rude. So put the damn thing down right now and go give your partner the orgasm she deserves!

Source: Giphy

h/t University of Virginia

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Nicolas DiDomizio

Nicolas DiDomizio is a Staff Connections Writer at Mic. Prior to Mic, he was at MTV for 3 years. He holds a masters from NYU and a bachelors from Western Connecticut State University. Contact him at nic@mic.com.

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