Fox News' Brit Hume Proposes "Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Don't Show" Policy for Trans People

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

If it were up to Brit Hume, he'd revive the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy and apply it to transgender people.

Hume, a Fox News analyst known for his conservative bent on public affairs, proposed a solution to the ongoing debate about North Carolina's law that mandates that transgender people use the bathroom that matches the gender on their birth certificate:

Hume made the incredibly insensitive comment during a panel discussion on the Fox News Sunday program.

He was referencing a policy that made being openly lesbian, gay or bisexual — and sometimes even the accusation of engaging in homosexual activity — grounds for discharge from the military. President Barack Obama and Congress asked the Department of Defense to end the policy in 2010.

Although DADT ended in 2011, many transgender people have been judged by the military as psychiatrically and medically unfit to serve. An Army manual revised in 2011 after the DADT repeal spells it out:

A history of, or current manifestations of, personality disorders, disorders of impulse control not elsewhere classified, transvestism, voyeurism, other paraphilias, or factitious disorders, psychosexual conditions, transsexual, gender identity disorder to include major abnormalities or defects of the genitalia such as change of sex or a current attempt to change sex, hermaphroditism, pseudohermaphroditism, or pure gonadal dysgenesis or dysfunctional residuals from surgical correction of these conditions render an individual administratively unfit.

Hume's apparent attempt at levity landed flat — as evidenced by the awkward silence and nervous laughter from the panel.

But it reeks of transphobia, at a time when the LGBT community is seeking reasoned debate about freedom to live authentically and move around in public space without oppressive government restrictions.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Aaron Morrison

Aaron is a Senior Staff Writer for The Movement at Mic. He covers the intersection of race, justice, politics, diversity and civil rights. He has previously written for IB TImes, Miami Herald, The Bergen Record of New Jersey and the Associated Press. Send tips to aaron@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.