This 3D Map of the Universe Will Send You Into a Beautiful, Existential Angst

Source: Subaru Telescope

You don't need to leave Earth to travel 3,000 galaxies and 13 billion lightyears away — just two minutes and this mind-blowing 3D map.

The map, created by a team led by astronomers in Japan, shows the density of the galaxies, the star formation rate and also the total number of stars in each galaxy. It serves as a visual depiction of Albert Einstein's theory that the universe is constantly expanding.

This is the deepest 3-D map of the universe to ever be created, thanks to the use of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Subaru Telescope's Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph. The FMOS can look at the universe from as far away as 14.7 billion lightyears. 

Source: YouTube

"It's a privilege to be able to publish our results 100 years after Einstein proposed his theory," researcher Teppei Okumura told ScienceDaily. The visuals build on a 2010 study from Princeton University that essentially confirmed Einstein's theory.

In his Theory of Relativity, Einstein developed the notion of the space-time continuum, in which "events that occur at the same time for one observer could occur at different times for another," according to Space.com

The map is a part of the space-surveying FastSound Project, and researchers hope to one day look at 5,000 galaxies to answer exactly why and how the universe is expanding.

Lose yourself in the journey below:

Source: YouTube

Read more: NASA Just Released 11 Stunning Posters Revealing the Beautiful Future of Space Tourism




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Kathleen Wong

Kathleen is a branded content staff writer at Mic. She is based in New York and can be reached at kathleen@mic.com.

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