Jennifer Lopez Claps Back at Hollywood's Sexist Expectations of Women

Jennifer Lopez Claps Back at Hollywood's Sexist Expectations of Women
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Jennifer Lopez knows she's been labeled a "diva" — but she doesn't understand why. 

Sure, she's been 15 minutes late to a shoot before. There's lots of traffic in Los Angeles, after all. But as she notes in the Hollywood Reporter's new roundtable, why does that lead to her being "berated" while men in Hollywood do much worse?

Read more: 'Black Panther' Director Ryan Coogler Nails Why Hollywood Needs Women Behind the Camera

"I've always been fascinated about how much more well-behaved we have to be than men," Lopez said in a roundtable of drama series actresses, speaking with Kerry Washington (Scandal), Kirsten Dunst (Fargo) and more. Lopez, there to represent her NBC series Shades of Blue, pulled no punches when it came to the question of sexism in Hollywood.

"I got a moniker of being 'the diva,' which I never felt I deserved — which I don't deserve — because I've always been a hard worker," she said. But she resents "getting that label because you reach a certain amount of success, or voice an opinion."

"We are not allowed to have certain opinions, or be a certain way, or be passionate," the actress, singer and producer continued. Indeed, many women in a range of industries are afraid to speak up in workplaces where men outnumber them. That's very much the case in Hollywood, where there are far more roles for men than women.

Watch the full video at the Hollywood Reporter.

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Kevin O'Keeffe

Kevin is the arts editor at Mic, writing about inclusion and representation in pop culture. He is based in New York and can be reached at kevin@mic.com.

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