Zombie Apocalypse: DHS Issues Zombie Alert

The United States government is referring to zombies for second time this year as the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a zombie alert, after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) denied the existence of zombies back in June.  

According to the AP, Homeland Security’s Citizen Corps held a webinar this month that highlighted that the same preparedness tactics one would use to survive a fictional zombie apocalypse can also be used to prepare for other natural or man-made disasters. The September 6 seminar said that the walking dead make for a great method of getting people interested in emergency preparedness.

“While the walking dead may not be first on your list of local hazards, zombie preparedness messages and activities have proven to be an effective way of engaging new audiences who may not be familiar with what to do before, during, or after a disaster, and to inject a little levity into preparedness while still informing and educating people,” the flier for the seminar explained.

The webinar included a speaker from the CDC who worked on their zombie campaign and someone from the Kansas Department of Emergency Management who was scheduled to talk about Zombie Awareness Month -- held each October to coincide with Halloween.

Among the government’s recommendations are to have an emergency evacuation plan and a fresh change of clothes. They also recommend keeping fresh water on hand as well as extra medications and emergency flashlights. Stay tuned. 

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