This Gay Couple's Secret Prom Rendezvous Is Truly Inspiring

This Gay Couple's Secret Prom Rendezvous Is Truly Inspiring
Source: Twitter
Source: Twitter

Prom night could be a great way to celebrate a seven-month anniversary for two high school sweethearts. But when Myren's parents wouldn't let him spend the night with his boyfriend Ralph, he was forced to pull off one of the most inspiring scams in prom history. 

"My parents told me I couldn't go to prom because I wanted to go with my boyfriend," the teenager tweeted on Saturday night. "So I had to go behind their backs."

With the help of their friends, who even arranged rides from their houses to the event for the boys, the couple was able to attend their big night without the fear of their parents intruding on the fun. 

Myren's prom night post instantly went viral, receiving well over 18,000 retweets by Monday morning. Although heading to prom on the low admittedly is not the easiest way to attend high school prom, the couple's successful rendezvous was celebrated by the masses.

Source: Mic/Twitter
Source: Mic/Twitter
Source: Mic/Twitter

"Just wanna thank everyone for the support," Ralph wrote on Twitter Sunday. "It's comforting to know that this word is becoming a better place."

"And if you still homophobic in 2016, I don't know what to tell you fam," he continued. "You got a big storm coming."


Read more: Queer Teens Are Now the Majority, Goodbye Straight People

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Chris Riotta

Chris Riotta is a culture reporter at Mic, covering news, music and entertainment. He is based in New York and can be reached at criotta@mic.com

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