Listen to Episode 3 of 'Special Relationship,' a Podcast From 'Mic' and The 'Economist'

For decades, the way to capturing voters' hearts and minds has been through bombarding their eyes and ears with television ads.

Presidential candidates and interest groups have already dumped millions into TV commercials this cycle. The spots are by turns ominous, amusing and provocative. 

But are Americans tuning out?

We explore the TV ad wars on the latest episode of Special Relationship, a podcast from Mic and the Economist that dives deep into the global implications of the race for president.

In episode 3, Mic senior political correspondent Celeste Katz and Economist U.S. editor John Prideaux scrutinize the meaning and evolution of campaign advertising in the United States and abroad.

Veteran strategist and admaker Jimmy Siegel opens the discussion with his take on the anatomy of a winning TV commercial. 

Political scientist Darrell West of the Brookings Institution dissects the changing impact of ads and forecasts the tone of a likely general election faceoff between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Plus, Matt Steinglass, the Economist's Europe editor, contrasts America's political broadcasting blitz with what voters get on The Continent.

Listen here:

Subscribe to Special Relationship on iTunesGoogle Play or wherever you listen to podcasts. Please rate and leave a review, and stay tuned for the fourth episode in two weeks.

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Celeste Katz

Celeste Katz is senior political correspondent at Mic, covering national politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at celeste@mic.com.

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