The Truly Marvelous Reason Ruth Bader Ginsburg Fell Asleep at the State of the Union

Source: AP
Source: AP

Supreme Court Justices, they're just like us. 

Just because you work on the nation's highest court doesn't mean you don't enjoy bonding with your co-workers over a drink or two (or three, or four, or five). Many of the current Supreme Court Justices, including Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, are big fans of wine in particular, Southern California Public Radio reported

Speaking at an event at the national Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., last week, the Notorious RBG admitted that the reason she frequently snoozes during the annual State of the Union addresses is because she's had too much wine. 

"A pre-State of the Union Address dinner, complete with wine, has become a tradition for the justices," Ginsburg explained at the event. "One year, Justice [Anthony] Kennedy came with a couple of bottles of Opus One from California. That was the first time I fell asleep during the State of the Union." Fair. 

(You too can get drunk on good wine and fall asleep during the next SOTU. While Opus One retails for around $265, here's a more affordable list of bottles.) 

Plus, when a new justice joins the court, the most junior justice must throw them a welcome "feast." At Justice Sonia Sotomayor's party, Justice Samuel Alito bought bottles of wine with a "picture of the Supreme Court and her name printed on the label," according to SPCR. 

The wine also flows freely at justices' birthday celebrations. The justices toast one another, and the Chief Justice is responsible for bringing the vino, Ginsburg revealed. 

There is no word on whether the justices prefer red or white wine. Either way, here's to hoping they won't be forced to drink Trump Wines in the case of a particular presidential outcome. 

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Khushbu Shah

Khushbu Shah is the deputy food editor. She can be reached at khushbu@mic.com.

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