Suspected Pulse Nightclub Shooter's Ex-Wife to 'Washington Post': "He Beat Me"

Source: MySpace
Source: MySpace

The ex-wife of 29-year-old Omar Mateen — the suspected lone gunman who opened fire at a gay Orlando, Florida, nightclub — said her ex-husband was mentally unstable and physically abused her during their marriage.

"He was not a stable person," the woman, who spoke anonymously, told the Washington Post. "He beat me. He would just come home and start beating me up because the laundry wasn't finished or something like that."

She told the Washington Post she and Mateen met eight years ago online, and she moved to Florida to be with him. Once her parents caught wind of the abuse, she said, they flew down to Florida and forcibly removed her from the house.

"They literally saved my life," she told the Washington Post.

While the FBI has not publicly identified Mateen as the attacker, his father, Mir Seddique, gave a statement to NBC News saying he and his family were "apologizing for the whole incident."

Seddique told the network that his son, who had a 3-year-old son of his own, became enraged after he witnessed two men kissing in downtown Miami recently. He said he did not believe that the attack had been motivated by religion.

Read more:
• Man Reportedly Going to LA Pride Parade With Guns, Possible Explosives Arrested
• In One Tweet, Trump Just Made the Tragic Mass Shooting in Orlando All About Him
• Pulse Nightclub Shooting Suspect Omar Mateen May Be Linked to ISIS

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Brianna Provenzano

Brianna is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. Send tips/inquiries to brianna@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.