Jamaica's Attorney General Subtweeted US Embassy to Take Down Its Rainbow Flag

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Jamaica's attorney general was displeased when she saw the U.S. Embassy flying a rainbow flag in the wake of Sunday's Orlando, Florida, massacre.

Just days after the United States experienced its worst gun shooting in modern history, which targeted a gay nightclub called Pulse during its Latin night, Marlene Malahoo Forte spoke out against the Embassy's show of solidarity, the BBC reported. 

Nations around the world are standing in solidarity with the LGBTQ community in the wake of the Orlando, Florida massacre.  Martin Meissner/AP

"I strongly condemn #OrlandoNightClubShooting but find it disrespectful of Jamaica's laws to have #RainbowFlag flown here," she wrote in a now-deleted tweet, ending the post with a hashtag, #MyPersonalView.

"We're listening," the U.S. Embassy in Jamaica wrote back on Twitter. "Explain the legal reasoning? It was an attack of terror !!and!! hate, targeting the LGBT community." 

Though she never replied to the Embassy, Forte later tweeted, "When we ask ask each other to respect our differences we should do so in all areas where we differ," she wrote. She then added, "If one's expression of difference evokes anger & hatred in u why do u presume expression of difference may not do same in others?"

Forte later tweeted an article revealing it only takes just seven minutes for someone to purchase an AR-15 in the U.S. 

The Embassy did not stop flying its flag at half-mast, instead promoting the fact U.S. Embassies "across the globe" were flying rainbow flags in memorial of the 49 victims killed Sunday morning. 

Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness later tweeted his condolences: "The bullet of terrorism does not discriminate, it does not know gender, class or sexual orientation. We all give the 49 lives lost."

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