New Physical Standards for Marine Recruits Overwhelmingly Weed Out Women

Source: AP
Source: AP

In the wake of December's federally-mandated directive that opened all combat jobs to women, the United States Marine Corps established a new set of physical standards designed to weed out anyone who isn't physically up to par for such a position.

The Marines, which voiced the loudest objections to Defense Secretary Ash Carter's decision, put into place a new plan designed to be more inclusive.

But instead of leveling the playing field, the new standards have generated some shockingly disparate results: Of the recruits who took the test, 86% of the women failed compared to 3% of men.

To pass the basic training tests, recruits must complete six pull-ups, run three miles in under 24:51 minutes and perform 60 lifts of a 30-pound ammunition can.

Finally, recruits must also complete a series of activities that mimic those of combat, including belly crawls and grenade throws. 

A photo posted by (@) on

When recruits fail the test, they're benched into Marine jobs that require less physical effort not on the front lines.

But Marine Commandant General Robert Neller told the Associated Press that the new standards are geared toward gender integration — not the other way around. 

"We're trying to raise everybody's bar a little bit and we're trying to figure out how to get closer together, because at the end of the day we're all going to be on the battlefield and we all have to be able to do our job," Neller said.


Read more:
These Female Marines Just Made History – Here's What You Need to Know
• Watch This Former Marine Take Down Military Rape Jokes in Under 2 Minutes
• Military Sexual Assault: Combat Isn't the Most Dangerous Place For Female Soldiers — This Is

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Kathleen Wong

Kathleen is a branded content staff writer at Mic. She is based in New York and can be reached at kathleen@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Third Vanderbilt football player, Brandon Banks, convicted in rape case

A jury found Brandon Banks guilty on one count of aggravated rape and one count of sexual battery, sending him to a probable 15 years in prison.

What does consent look like on a show like 'Bachelor in Paradise'?

Warner Bros. has cleared the allegations involving Corinne Olympios and DeMario Jackson, leaving many questions about consent on the show in its wake.

Bill Cosby juror didn't believe Andrea Constand because Constand wore "bare midriff" to Cosby's home

This juror's response to Constand's testimony is victim blaming 101.

In North Carolina, women can't withdraw consent after giving it

The state's consent law says that once someone gives consent, they can't revoke it.

Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman was catcalled on stage and it didn't go well

Hall of fame hockey player Marcel Dionne yelled "Look at those legs!" while onstage with Raisman at the 2017 NHL Awards.

How the Senate's draft health care plan could affect reproductive services

It is very close to the House's version of the bill, and would block federal funding for Planned Parenthood for a year.

Third Vanderbilt football player, Brandon Banks, convicted in rape case

A jury found Brandon Banks guilty on one count of aggravated rape and one count of sexual battery, sending him to a probable 15 years in prison.

What does consent look like on a show like 'Bachelor in Paradise'?

Warner Bros. has cleared the allegations involving Corinne Olympios and DeMario Jackson, leaving many questions about consent on the show in its wake.

Bill Cosby juror didn't believe Andrea Constand because Constand wore "bare midriff" to Cosby's home

This juror's response to Constand's testimony is victim blaming 101.

In North Carolina, women can't withdraw consent after giving it

The state's consent law says that once someone gives consent, they can't revoke it.

Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman was catcalled on stage and it didn't go well

Hall of fame hockey player Marcel Dionne yelled "Look at those legs!" while onstage with Raisman at the 2017 NHL Awards.

How the Senate's draft health care plan could affect reproductive services

It is very close to the House's version of the bill, and would block federal funding for Planned Parenthood for a year.