This Is the Transgender Bathroom Ad Campaign America's Been Waiting For

Source: NYC Commission on Human Rights

New York City is setting itself apart on the deeply contentious — and very silly — issue of which bathrooms transgender people should be allowed to use.

In June, the city's Commission on Human Rights used a relatively paltry $265,000 to launch a pioneering ad campaign called #BeYouNYC, which encourages residents to use bathrooms that correspond to their gender identity. 

The ads have begun to appear on television:

Source: YouTube
Source: YouTube

And on subways, which carry an average weekly ridership of 5.7 million:

The ads appear in English:


As well as en Español:


There's even a helpful factsheet that dispels commonly held myths about the city's bathroom policies:


The whole thing brings home the message that transgender people shouldn't be criminalized for being human. "We are ordinary people, living ordinary lives," one ad says.

Source: YouTube

Take that, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory

Read more: 
Here's Why North Carolina's Anti-Trans Lawsuit is a Big Waste of Time and Money
The Next Stage in Anti-Trans Backlash Isn't Bathrooms, It's Birth Certificates
North Carolina Amends HB2 "Bathroom Law" 

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Jamilah King

Jamilah King is a senior staff writer at Mic. She was previously an editor at Colorlines.

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