Larry Wilmore Delivered a Powerful Segment About the Death of Alton Sterling

Source: Comedy Central

On Wednesday night's episode of The Nightly Show, after news broke of the death of 37-year-old Alton Sterling at the hands of police — host Larry Wilmore delivered a powerful indictment of police violence against black Americans and the startling regularity with which black people are shot and killed by police officers.

"To be frank with you, we're just tired of this shit happening and feel like we have to address it in some way," he said.

But, as Wilmore pointed out, these stories aren't new — it's just that more smartphones means more video evidence than ever before. 

But the evidence only shows how often black Americans are being killed on the spot by police — only to have their killings justified by reports of "past criminal histories."

"Whenever this happens, there's always an immediate takedown of the dead man's character," Wilmore said. "So he had a criminal record, Martha Stewart has a criminal record ... No matter what his crimes were, Alton Sterling did not deserve to be executed for them."

The reality that Wilmore pointed out is that black Americans are being killed. The people who believe #BlackLivesMatter likely are already aware of this, but the people who believe that #AllLivesMatter should be up in arms too, Wilmore sai, if they really stand by what they say.

Here's a list of 23 everyday activities that are apparently punishable by immediate execution in the U.S. — at least, if you're black.

Read more:
• 23 Everyday Actions Punishable by Death if You're Black in America
• Alton Sterling Is the 114th Known Black Man Killed by Police in the US in 2016
• Video Captures Moment Baton Rouge Police Shot Alton Sterling on the Ground

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Anna Swartz

Anna is a staff writer for Mic covering breaking news. She can be reached at aswartz@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Anthony Scaramucci acknowledges “colorful language” after ‘New Yorker’ published his wild rant

Scaramucci's "colorful language" revealed the high-stakes tension going on at the White House.

Lindsey Graham says he is creating legislation to block Trump from firing Mueller

Graham said earlier that ousting Mueller would mark the "beginning of the end of the Trump presidency."

Despite Trump, military leaders say there will be no changes to transgender policy for now

“In the meantime, we will continue to treat all of our personnel with respect."

Trump will visit Long Island to discuss gang violence — but some fear he could make the issue worse

Trump has celebrated mass deportations as fighting gang violence — but are his words helping or hurting?

Like his boss, Anthony Scaramucci seems to be a fan of disgraced football coach Joe Paterno

President Donald Trump also gave a shout-out to the late Penn State coach during the 2016 campaign.

‘Hot Mic’ podcast: Transgender ban, GOP healthcare struggling, video games relieve work stress

What you need to know for Thursday, July 27.

Anthony Scaramucci acknowledges “colorful language” after ‘New Yorker’ published his wild rant

Scaramucci's "colorful language" revealed the high-stakes tension going on at the White House.

Lindsey Graham says he is creating legislation to block Trump from firing Mueller

Graham said earlier that ousting Mueller would mark the "beginning of the end of the Trump presidency."

Despite Trump, military leaders say there will be no changes to transgender policy for now

“In the meantime, we will continue to treat all of our personnel with respect."

Trump will visit Long Island to discuss gang violence — but some fear he could make the issue worse

Trump has celebrated mass deportations as fighting gang violence — but are his words helping or hurting?

Like his boss, Anthony Scaramucci seems to be a fan of disgraced football coach Joe Paterno

President Donald Trump also gave a shout-out to the late Penn State coach during the 2016 campaign.

‘Hot Mic’ podcast: Transgender ban, GOP healthcare struggling, video games relieve work stress

What you need to know for Thursday, July 27.