Hillary Clinton Supports Black Lives Matter in Wake of Police Shootings

 Hillary Clinton Supports Black Lives Matter in Wake of Police Shootings
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

In a tweet addressing the Tuesday morning death of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, resident Alton Sterling at the hands of police, Democratic presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton invoked the Black Lives Matter movement.

"Something is profoundly wrong when so many Americans have reason to believe that our country doesn't consider them as precious as others because of the color of their skin," her statement read. 

Clinton emphasized the importance of rebuilding trust between law enforcement and "the communities they serve." 

"That begins with common sense reforms like ending racial profiling, providing better training on de-escalation and implicit bias, and supporting municipalities that refer the investigation and prosecution of police-involved deaths to independent bodies," she wrote. 

"Progress is possible if we stand together and never waver in our fight to secure the future that every American deserves."

Clinton doubled down on her support of BLM Wednesday after another black man, Philando Castile, was shot and killed by police during a traffic stop in a suburb of St. Paul, Minnesota.

"Alton Sterling Matters. Philando Castile Matters. Black Lives Matter," the tweet read.

Clinton previously came out in support of BLM last July when speaking to a crowd in South Carolina. "It is essential that we all stand up and say loudly and clearly, 'Yes, black lives matter,'" she said. 

Read more:
• Must-Read Tweetstorm Sheds Light on the Black Condition After Philando Castile's Death
• Days Before Deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, NYPD Killed Delrawn Small
• Bill Clinton Thought He Was Talking to Black Lives Matter Activists in Philly. He Wasn't.

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Kathleen Wong

Kathleen is a branded content staff writer at Mic. She is based in New York and can be reached at kathleen@mic.com.

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