In Wake of the Dallas Shooting, We Can Look to the Nation's Front Pages — Or Beyond them

Source: Newseum
Source: Newseum

There's a familiar scene unfolding across America's newsstands today. 

Source: Newseum

Its started in the hours following Thursday night's massacre at a Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas.

Source: Newseum

Tragedies were immediately inked onto the front pages of nation's our biggest newspapers. 

Source: Newseum

"Slain." "Bloodshed." "Killed."

But amidst these tragedies, we can choose the story we remember about senseless violence in America.

Source: Newseum

We can look to the front pages — or look beyond them.

Source: Newseum

We can fixate on violence — or identify love. 

Source: Newseum

While each tragedy can showcases the worst of people ...

Source: Newseum

... it also unearths the best.

Source: Twitter

Like when Muslims broke their holy fast to donate blood for Orlando, Florida, victims.

Like when these police officers posed in solidarity with these Black Lives Matter protestor.

Source: Twitter

Like when these two Black Lives Matter activists got married in Ferguson, Missouri.

Source: Twitter

Like when white people took a stand for black lives.

Source: Alex Brandon/AP

Our nation's history reflects the stories we tell ourselves. And the stories we read from others. It's up to us to choose them.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Jessica Eggert

Jessica is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. She is based in New York and can be reached at jessica@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.