In One Quote, Trevor Noah Identified Our Problem With Race and the Police Force

Source: Comedy Central

In what felt like an eerie foreshadowing of Thursday night's police massacre in Dallas, Daily Show host Trevor Noah spent part of that evening's episode addressing the relationship between race and the police force in the United States. 

Noah argued that the binary nature of how the country perceives race and the police creates a polarizing atmosphere — that the associated dialogue does not allow for people to simultaneously support racial equality and the police force, the host opined. 

"The hardest part of having a conversation surrounding police shootings in America: It always feels like, in America, it's like if you take a stand for something, you automatically are against something else," he said.

"Anyway, the point is, it's either one or the other," he later added. "But with police shootings, it shouldn't have to work that way. For instance, if you're pro-Black Lives Matter, you're assumed to be anti-police and if you're pro-police, then you surely hate black people." 

"It seems that it's either pro-cop and anti-black or pro-black and anti-cop, when, in reality, you can be pro-cop and pro-black, which is what we should all be. It is what we should be aiming for," Noah said to a resounding applause. 

This week has been particularly fraught with the police shootings of two black men, Alton Sterling and Philando Castile. The subsequent Black Lives Matter protest in Dallas ended with a shooting that left five officers dead and seven wounded. 

As Noah observed, you can't fix an issue until you acknowledge it's broken. 

Watch the full clip here.

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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