'Pokémon Go' Allows Users to Use Gender-Fluid Avatars — And Gamers Are Loving It

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Pokémon Go is letting its users find and catch Pokémon through gender-fluid avatars, according to the Independent — and gamers love it.

When players create their avatars, they're given the option to choose between two styles, as opposed to asking players to choose between genders. Then players are allowed to customize their avatars' physical appearances and fashion. This allows a lot of players who aren't on the gender binary to actually create an avatar that looks like them.

Perhaps this option was born out of a direct request from gamers. Months ago, Pokémon fans created a petition addressed to Nintendo to request the addition of an "other" gender option.

"People identify with many more genders than this binary question suggests," the petition said. "Some are gender-fluid, switching between genders; nonbinary, identifying as a third gender; or agender, identifying with no gender at all. There are many more identities than just the three listed as examples."

Kudos to Pokémon for recognizing the many genders of gamers.


Read more:
Does 'Pokémon Go' Use Data? Yes. A Lot of Data. And People Are Pissed
#DontPokemonGoAndDrive Trends After 'Pokémon Go' Hoax Stories
'Pokémon Go' Cheats: How to Get More Pokéballs Without Having to Walk Around

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Sarah A. Harvard

Sarah is a staff writer covering religion, race and politics. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, The Huffington Post, TeenVogue, and VICE. Send tips and feedback: sharvard@mic.com

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