A Sikh Man at Wimbledon Was Kicked Out of Line — Can You Guess Why?

Source: AP
Source: AP

A Sikh man was pulled from an overnight line for Wimbledon after being told he was making fellow attendees uncomfortable.

The man described the incident in detail on his Facebook page: "You ... make some people around you ... uncomfortable, so we're gonna have to report you and ask you to leave immediately, sir."

The man, who wears a turban and told Metro News he didn't want to be identified, wrote on Facebook that he blamed post-Brexit racism and "the overt rise of neo-fascism" for preventing him from taking in Wimbledon at center court.

"All I wanted was to peacefully chill and patiently await an opportunity to re-enter the hallowed grounds and see the decorated surface while Roger and Milos scamper and glide across it," he wrote.

Source: Facebook

The man was eventually let back into line hours later. A Wimbledon spokesperson confirmed what had happened, saying event safety staff "could have provided a better explanation to him."

"I was one of three people of color out of around 120 other people who weren't ethnic," the man told the Metro

This is just the latest in an up-cropping of xenophobia in the U.K., including hate speech and criminal property damage.

For the Sikh man, it was an event that changed how he viewed one of his favorite tournaments. "I don't feel like I'm ever going back now," he told Metro. "[I] can no longer definitely say it's a lifelong dream to play on center court."

Read more:
Brexit Update: Here's the Latest News on the UK Referendum to Leave the European Union
• People on Twitter React to #Brexit by Calling Out Britain's History of Colonialism
• After Brexit, Facebook Group Shows White Nationalist Hate Speech Catching Fire in UK

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Max Plenke

Max Plenke is a staff writer at Mic, where he covers breaking news, climate science, health and the future. His work has appeared in Esquire, GQ and Wallpaper. Send story tips to max@mic.com.

MORE FROM

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.