Want to Find Rare Pokémon? This Crowdsourced 'Pokémon Go' Map Will Help

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Millilons of Pokémon Go players are out there as we speak, hunting for the rarest Pokémon in the game — probably to no avail. Most neighborhoods are chock full of Ratatta and Pidgeys with nary a Pikachu or a Magmar to be found. But a new crowdsourced interactive map is letting users report where they've seen different kinds of Pokémon — and it may help you find exactly what you're looking for.

The map is called PokéMapper, and Inverse reported on Wednesday that, in just it's first two hours online, PokéMapper received submissions from 3,000 users.

Source: PokéMatter

Apparently the map has already revealed patterns. "Generally, electric types seem to be drawn to big urban cities, while fire types are more concentrated in the South," Inverse reported. "Water types, so far, do in fact appear around water, but no determinable pattern is emerging for psychic types."

Of course, like any tool that relies on user supplied-data, there's always the chance that people aren't telling the truth — or that they're trying to mess with you by sending you to find a Pikachu in the middle of a lake.

Read more:
• Trevor Noah Set 'Pokémon Go' Lures Along the Hudson River
• These Numbers Show Just How Staggering the 'Pokémon Go' Phenomenon Really Is
• 'Pokémon Go' Players Will Kayak Into the Ocean If It Means Claiming a Gym

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Anna Swartz

Anna is a staff writer for Mic covering breaking news. She can be reached at aswartz@mic.com.

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