How to Change Your Facebook Photo to French Flag in Wake of Nice, France, Attack

Source: Public Domain Pictures

A Bastille Day celebration in Nice, France, was disrupted by a truck barreling through a crowd, killing at least 70 and injuring more than 100, reports say.

Police are calling the event a "terror attack," according to Time. If terrorism is the case, this will be the third attack in France in 18 months, starting with the June 2015 attack that killed 17 at the office of satire paper Charlie Hebdo and a nearby kosher supermarket, followed by the Paris attacks in November 2015.

When Paris was attacked, people took to Facebook to show their support by casting French flag filters over their Facebook profile photos. Here's how you can show your support the same way for Nice.

1. Find a website that offers filter overlays on original photos. Rainbow Filter is the site we used.

Avoid letting this site access your Facebook page. Instead, just hit "France Filter!"

2. Take your Facebook profile photo and drag it to your desktop.

Your author
Source: 
Facebook

3. Click on the "France Filter!" button. Again, don't worry about logging into Facebook.

The profile photo, with flag overlaid.
Source: 
Rainbow Filter

4. Hit the "Download Picture" button, then upload your new profile photo to Facebook.

The image ready for cropping on Facebook
Source: 
Facebook

5. You're all set.

Read more:
• Bastille Day Crash: Videos Show Aftermath of Truck Crashing Into Nice, France, Celebration
• Donald Trump Responds to Bastille Day Attack in Nice, France: "It Is Only Getting Worse"
• Bastille Day "Attack": Truck Crashes Into Nice Celebration, Several Dead, Gunfire Reported

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Max Plenke

Max Plenke is a staff writer at Mic, where he covers breaking news, climate science, health and the future. His work has appeared in Esquire, GQ and Wallpaper. Send story tips to max@mic.com.

MORE FROM

An everyday cooking spice may help fight the most common type of cancer found in infants

Children normally suffer health risks from chemo or other forms of cancer treatment, but this spice could help.

Facebook is rumored to be working on a smart speaker — here’s everything we know

Imagine a world where you can hear your Facebook comments on your smart speaker.

There’s now a cochlear implant processor made to work with your iPhone

It's allegedly the first in the world of its kind.

Scientists edited mice brains so that they live longer — and humans could be next

Scientists managed to extend mouse life spans by up to 15%.

You’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse from ridiculous heights, thanks to these balloons

Watch the eclipse live, anywhere, as if you're in space.

Scientists say you should play video games on your breaks at work

Somebody file an expense report for an Xbox, pronto.

An everyday cooking spice may help fight the most common type of cancer found in infants

Children normally suffer health risks from chemo or other forms of cancer treatment, but this spice could help.

Facebook is rumored to be working on a smart speaker — here’s everything we know

Imagine a world where you can hear your Facebook comments on your smart speaker.

There’s now a cochlear implant processor made to work with your iPhone

It's allegedly the first in the world of its kind.

Scientists edited mice brains so that they live longer — and humans could be next

Scientists managed to extend mouse life spans by up to 15%.

You’ll be able to watch the solar eclipse from ridiculous heights, thanks to these balloons

Watch the eclipse live, anywhere, as if you're in space.

Scientists say you should play video games on your breaks at work

Somebody file an expense report for an Xbox, pronto.