Selena Gomez's Response to Tweet About #BlackLivesMatter Gets Roasted on Twitter

Source: AP
Source: AP

Selena Gomez went on Twitter to defend her best friend Taylor Swift after Kim Kardashian West leaked video footage on Snapchat of a phone call Kanye West had with Swift.

In Kardashian West's video, you can hear Swift agreeing to the lyrics in question of West's infamous track "Famous" on The Life of Pablo. Then, Twitter users convened an epic #KimExposedTaylorParty

But Swift's BFF tried to crash the party by saying people don't use their voice to stand up for something that matters. 

Twitter users were quick to clap back at the actress' response.

When a user asked Gomez why she chose to be silent on police brutality and #BlackLivesMatter, she responded hastily by referring to the movement as just a hashtag that takes a side. The tweet is now deleted, but here is a screenshot:

In contrast, Kardashian West has never been shy about speaking out about injustice. In the last few years, she's written an op-ed for Time on the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, criticized a Wall Street Journal ad, spoken out against gun violence and even wrote a post on her website in support of #BlackLivesMatter.

That can't be said about Swift or Gomez, as users pointed out.

Users also responded to her dismissive remarks about the Black Lives Matter movement and called her out for not practicing what she preaches:


Meanwhile, here's Kardashian West:

Read More:
• In One Snapchat Story, Kim Kardashian West Just Set Fire to the Kanye-Taylor Feud
• Selena Gomez Is Now the Most Followed Person on Instagram, Beating Out BFF Taylor Swift
• Kim Kardashian's Website Goes Full #BlackLivesMatter Following Dallas Shooting

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Sarah A. Harvard

Sarah is a staff writer covering religion, race and politics. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, The Huffington Post, TeenVogue, and VICE. Send tips and feedback: sharvard@mic.com

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.