Melania Trump's RNC Speech Wasn't the Only Time She "Borrowed" Her Words From Black Women

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Melania Trump is a woman of few words. 

That is, if you're judging by her Twitter account, which mostly features photographs of her travels, floral arrangements and her family.

After she auditioned to become the nation's next first lady Monday night at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, questions arose over whether her words were her own. It's been widely reported that Trump's primetime speech sounded eerily similar to the speech Michelle Obama won rave reviews for during in 2008 for the Democratic National Convention.

The Trump campaign has denied that Melania Trump lifted Obama's words for the speech. But the similarities between the speeches are striking.

It turns out Monday night's speech wasn't the only time Trump's words appeared to have first been said by a black woman. 

Although, as mentioned above, the vast majority of Trump's tweets feature photos of her lavish life, in 2012 she quoted (and not credited) words from the late African-American educator Marva Collins. Collins, who started a school with money from her own teacher's pension fund in Chicago, was most notably depicted in The Marva Collins Story, a 1981 TV movie starring Cicely Tyson as Collins.

Imitation is a form of flattery.

But the denial by the Trump campaign of any impropriety over the speech rubbed many critics the wrong way. "The blatant dismissal of politics' most visible black American woman's words perfectly illustrates how little value is placed on the words and experience of the black body," Fusion's Collier Meyerson wrote Tuesday.

For Trump's sake, being caught in a lie and not owning up to it only makes things worse. Ask Rachel Dolezal.


Read more:
• Melania Trump's 2016 RNC Speech Is Eerily Close to Michelle Obama's 2008 DNC Speech
• Donald Trump's "We Are the Champions" RNC Entrance Betrays a Cruel Irony
• Sheriff David Clarke at RNC: "Blue Lives Matter!"

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Aaron Morrison

Aaron is a Senior Staff Writer for The Movement at Mic. He covers the intersection of race, justice, politics, diversity and civil rights. He has previously written for IB TImes, Miami Herald, The Bergen Record of New Jersey and the Associated Press. Send tips to aaron@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Venezuela's Supreme Court targeted in helicopter attack amid ongoing crisis

The apparent helicopter attack is the latest escalation of an ongoing political crisis.

Iran calls Supreme Court's travel ban decision "racist" and "unfair"

Iranian officials criticized Trump's de-facto Muslim ban this week.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Design for New York's first official LGBTQ monument is unveiled

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

Venezuela's Supreme Court targeted in helicopter attack amid ongoing crisis

The apparent helicopter attack is the latest escalation of an ongoing political crisis.

Iran calls Supreme Court's travel ban decision "racist" and "unfair"

Iranian officials criticized Trump's de-facto Muslim ban this week.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Design for New York's first official LGBTQ monument is unveiled

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.