On the Anniversary of Apollo 11, Watch Buzz Aldrin Punch a Moon Truther in the Face

On the Anniversary of Apollo 11, Watch Buzz Aldrin Punch a Moon Truther in the Face
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Forty-seven years ago today, in 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people to set foot on the moon. Even though we can still see pieces of equipment we left up there, even though we have moon rock samples sitting in museums, there are still people who don't believe it happened.

So on the anniversary of the day the first humans actually walked on the moon, lets all remember the time Aldrin got so sick of conspiracy theorists that he punched one in the face. 

In 2002, filmmaker and conspiracy theorist Bart Sibrel confronted Aldrin with a video camera and demanded that he swear on the Bible that the moon landing really happened. 

You can hear Sibrel call him a coward, a liar and a thief — just before Aldrin shuts him up.

Buzz Aldrin shuts up a moon truther.
Source: 
Giphy

Aldrin was never charged for anything — arguably fair, considering he risked his life for the sake of science and exploration. 

You can watch the build-up to the punch in the video below:

Source: YouTube

Read more:
• Congress Challenges NASA to Get to Jupiter's Moon Europa
• Scientists Think They Know How Water Ended Up on the Moon
• Earth Has Another "Quasi-Moon" — Meet Asteroid 2016 HO3

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