Baton Rouge Manifesto: Gavin Long Allegedly Called His Fatal Attack a "Necessary Evil"

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

In an alleged handwritten manifesto, Gavin Long, the man who shot and killed three Baton Rouge, Louisiana, police officers and injured three others on Sunday, ostensibly said that his actions were a "necessary evil." Long was fatally shot by police after the events.

As first reported by BuzzFeed, Long emailed the three-page letter to Ohio resident Yarima Karama less than an hour before the officers were ambushed. The Marine veteran purportedly wrote that violence was needed to "create substantial change within America's police forces and judicial system." 

The letter, signed using the alias "Cosmo" Long used online, goes on about the battle between "good cops & bad cops."

"Right now there is a unseen & concealed war within America's police force between Good cops & Bad cops," the letter reads. "And the way the current system is set up, it protects all cops whether good or bad, right or wrong, instead of punishing bad cops & holding them accountable for their actions."

A woman places flowers at a memorial for the officers killed.
Source: 
Joshua Lott/Getty Images

Long never mentions Baton Rouge specifically in the letter but references the killings of black men at the hands of police.

"Protected and unpunished bad cops forces melanated people to label the good cop as potential threats to the safety and well-being of our women, family, and children," Long allegedly wrote. Long also allegedly wrote that he will be "vilified by the media."

According to the Associated Press, authorities found other handwritten documents in Long's car and hotel. 

The murder of the Baton Rouge officers comes after protests following the killing of Alton Sterling, who was shot by officers while selling CDs outside of a convenience store.

Read more:
• Jesse Williams Just Tweeted a Perfect Response to the Shooting of Alton Sterling
• 23 Everyday Actions Punishable by Death if You're Black in America
• Dallas Police Shooting Started as a Peaceful Protest, Not a Black Lives Matter Attack

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Ashley Edwards

Ashley Edwards is a news editor for Mic covering breaking and trending news. She previously worked at the New York Daily News and PIX11 News.

MORE FROM

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.