Chick fil A Loses Out to Power of the People, Will Stop Funding Anti Gay Groups

Chick-fil-A has agreed to cease making donations to anti-gay groups. This is a wonderful gesture on their part, and very grownup like. It reminds me of back in the day when I made my first Confession at the age of seven. I’d done some things the Catholic Church deemed to be sinful, and agreed to offer up a penance for my sins. The priest didn’t ask me to change my ways; he just asked that I say five Our Fathers and six Hail Marys. I was expecting a rosary and two Novenas, so I got off lightly.

The firestorm that grew out of the Chick-fil-A comments regarding gay marriage hasn’t changed anything at Chick-fil-A headquarters; they still disapprove of it — as is their right. Many people who boycotted them back in August have started going back because, let’s face it, the food is good. We don’t want to make our dining decisions based on the politics of restaurant owners any more than we want to be preached to by them.

I’ve known about the bible-thumping ways of Chick-fil-A President and COO Dan Cathy's family for years, and it never interfered with my appreciation for their food until they decided to talk about it publicly. It’s okay to be a hateful bigot in our society as long as you keep it to yourself. Go public and we have to do something about it. Thankfully, we’re not prone to violence; when we’re unhappy we boycott.

The decision to adopt a corporate policy of not supporting hate groups is well short of an apology for their bigotry, but it’s way better than the status quo. They don’t have to apologize for believing what they believe because this is a free country. But at least they’ve learned there is a consequence associated with not knowing when to keep your opinions to yourself.

Big whoop. Now can I have some waffle fries with that chicken sandwich?

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Michael Cain

Author, PTSD coach, highly opinionated.

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