When Does Serena Williams Play Next? Here's the US Tennis Champion's Rio Olympics Schedule

When Does Serena Williams Play Next? Here's the US Tennis Champion's Rio Olympics Schedule
Source: AP
Source: AP

Serena Williams is a tennis goddess, and like some goddesses, she's expected to smite her competition and win gold at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio De Janeiro.

Serena Williams
Source: 
Adam Davy/AP

This will be the fourth Olympic Games for Williams. The tennis all-star, who has 22 Grand Slam titles to her name, has never earned a medal below Gold. Williams won gold in Doubles at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, as well as 2008 in Beijing and 2012 in London. She also won the gold medal in Singles at the 2012 London Olympic Games. 

This year, Williams is expected to win gold again in the Doubles competition teaming up with her sister Venus Williams. Serena Williams will also be competing in the Singles competition.

If you're looking to cheer for Williams, here's the American Tennis Champion's schedule at Rio, according to NBCOlympics.com. The times are listed according to Brasilia's Standard Time (BRT):

Round 1: Singles at 11:45 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6

Williams is seeded first among all female tennis singles competitors. On Saturday, she will be facing Australia's Daria Gavrilova. If Williams defeats Gavrilova in the first round, she will move on to round 2. 

Round 1: Doubles at 5:45 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6

Serena and Venus Williams are seeded first ahead of France's Carolina Garcia and Kristina Mladenovic. They will be competing against Czech Republic's Lucie Safarova and Barbora Strycova.

Venus and Serena Williams
Source: 
Ben Curtis/AP

Round 2: Singles between 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8

When Williams defeats Gavrilova, she will move on to round 2. If Williams defeats her opponent in the second round, she will move onto the third round before qualifying for the quarterfinals.

Round 2: Doubles between 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 8

If the Williams sisters beat Safarova and Strycova, they will have to compete in round 2 before making it to the quarterfinals.

Round 3: Singles between 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 9

Williams will have to compete in the third round before qualifying for the quarterfinals.

Quarterfinals: Doubles between 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 9

The Williams sisters will have reached the quarterfinals at this point, and if they defeat their opponents, they will move to the semifinals.

Quarterfinals: Singles between 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10

If Williams wins her quarterfinals round, she will move to the semifinals.

Serena Williams
Source: 
Vadim Ghirda/AP

Semifinals: Singles between 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 11

If Williams wins this semifinals round, she will move on to the final two matches that will dictate where she will place on the Olympic podium.

Semifinals: Doubles between 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 11

If Williams sisters wins this semifinals round, they will move on to the final two matches that will determine where they will place on the Olympic podium.

Serena Williams
Source: 
Clive Brunskill/Getty Images

Finals: Doubles Bronze Medal Match at 11 a.m. Saturday Aug. 13

If the Williams powerhouse duo wins this match, they'll move on to the last and final match that will determine their placing — either silver or gold — on the podium.

Finals: Doubles Gold Medal Match at 1:30 p.m. Sunday Aug. 14

This is the last match for the Williams duo at the 2016 Rio Olympics. If they lose, they'll receive the silver medal. If they win, they'll bring back home the gold.

*This schedule will be updated once the tennis competition begins.

Read more: 
• Brazil Couldn't Fix Its Water Pollution Problem in Time for the 2016 Rio Olympics
• 5 Years Ago, This Runner Tweeted Her Dream to Go to the Olympics — Now It's Coming True
• Here's What It Costs to Host the 2016 Rio Olympics and How It Compares to Previous Games

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Sarah A. Harvard

Sarah is a staff writer covering religion, race and politics. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, The Atlantic, Slate, The Huffington Post, TeenVogue, and VICE. Send tips and feedback: sharvard@mic.com

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