Donald Trump adviser on the Holocaust: "The ovens were too small to kill 6 million Jews"

Source: AP
Source: AP

One of Donald Trump's foreign policy advisers has been accused of anti-Semitic behavior, having allegedly boasted about firing Jewish employees while serving at the Defense Department, in addition to denying the Holocaust was as bad as official accounts, according to a report published Thursday by McClatchy.

The allegations against Joseph Schmitz, who served as inspector general at the Defense Department from 2002 to 2005, were revealed in a complaint filed by Daniel Meyer, an intelligence official who oversaw whistleblower cases at the Defense Department. Meyer says he was retaliated against for reporting "public corruption," McClatchy reported

In his complaint, Meyer claims Schmitz was proud of firing Jewish employees during Schmitz's time as IG.

"His summary of his tenure's achievement reported as '... I fired the Jews,'" Meyer wrote in the complaint, according to McClatchy.


Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/election/article96421087.html#storylink=cpy

Meyer claimed that another Pentagon official, John Crane, also witnessed Schmitz's alleged anti-Semitic behavior.

"[Schmitz] allegedly lectured Mr. Crane on the details of concentration camps and how the ovens were too small to kill 6 million Jews," Meyer wrote in the complaint, McClatchy reported. 


Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/election/article96421087.html#storylink=cpy


Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics-government/election/article96421087.html#storylink=cpy

Schmitz denied the charges, telling McClatchy that they're "completely false and defamatory." 

Still, the report raises questions about the company Trump keeps on his presidential campaign.

Earlier this year, a staffer on Trump's campaign retweeted an image of Hillary Clinton showing her surrounded by money and what appeared to be a Star of David — an image that originated on a message board frequented by Neo-Nazis and white supremacists.

And in February, it took Trump multiple attempts to disavow the endorsement of David Duke, a noted white supremacist. 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Emily C. Singer

Emily C. Singer, née Cahn, is a senior writer for Mic covering politics. She is based in New York and can be reached at esinger@mic.com

MORE FROM

Burned Quran stuffed with bacon found outside California mosque

This isn't the first time bacon has been used as an act of provocation against Muslims.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

Burned Quran stuffed with bacon found outside California mosque

This isn't the first time bacon has been used as an act of provocation against Muslims.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.