Trolls attack bakery that made a transgender Ken Doll cake

Source: Facebook
Source: Facebook

Just because something is an inanimate object doesn't mean it is safe from online hate and bigotry. A bakery in Sacramento, California, learned this the hard way this month when it made a transgender Ken doll cake, Fox 40 reported. 

The custom cake, created by the team at Freeport Bakery, featured Ken in a ruffled pink dress crafted from frosting. The doll also sported a coordinating flower sash, big jewelry and a crown. Marlene Goetzeler, co-owner of bakery, posted an image of the cake to Facebook, on Aug. 13 with the caption, "Ken's looking good."

Things quickly took a turn for the worse. Trolls left mean comments about the dolled-up baked good, Grub Street noted. Commenters called the cake "disgusting" and even suggested Goetzeler's morals and standards were "for sale" because her bakery made a transgender cake. The bakery lost dozens of likes on Facebook and "potential business" because of the image, Fox 40 noted. 

The hate also extended to Twitter:

Goetzeler told Fox 40 she "was shocked that somebody would be offended." Eventually other, more accepting commenters came to the rescue by posting a number of supportive comments. "Beautiful cake! Keep up the excellent work!" wrote one person on Facebook, while many others gushed about how much they loved the cake. 

Most importantly, the cake was a hit at the party where it was served. Chad Graham, someone who attended the party, told Fox 40 the other attendees did not expect the backlash, and he thought the cake was "fantastic." 

Cakes have somehow become an LGBTQ battleground. In 2015, the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries ordered a local bakery  to pay a lesbian couple $135,000 in damages after the shop refused to make the couple a wedding cake. That same year, a court in Colorado ruled a baker could not refuse to make wedding cakes for same-sex couples due to his religious beliefs. 

Hopefully, people will stop taking out their personal ideologies on baked goods. At the end of the day, no cake recipe calls for bigotry as an ingredient.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Khushbu Shah

Khushbu Shah is the deputy food editor. She can be reached at khushbu@mic.com.

MORE FROM

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.