The 2016 harvest Moon eclipse will be the last one for 8 years — here's how to see it


The 2016 harvest Moon eclipse will be the last one for 8 years — here's how to see it
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

There's only one more eclipse left in 2016. Fortunately, it's going to be badass. The Sept. 16 lunar eclipse coincides with a harvest Moon, meaning you'll see a giant, orange moon overtaken by the shadow of the Earth. And if you miss it, bad news — it's the last of its kind until 2024.

A regular, non-harvest moon penumbral eclipse, showing the faint shadow of the Earth over the Moon
Source: 
Bullit Marquez/AP

Here's how and when to watch this year's harvest moon penumbral eclipse:

The best possible view of the eclipse, when it's at its "deepest and darkest," is at 2:54 p.m. Eastern time, according to National Geographic — but the views will be best if you live in Europe, Africa, Asia or Australia. If you don't live in any of those places, don't worry — the Slooh observatory launches its harvest Moon penumbral lunar eclipse livestream on Friday, Sept. 16, at 12:45 p.m. Eastern time.

The whole event lasts for just under four hours, as the moon passes through Earth's outer shadow, called the penumbra.

Unlike the super blood moon total eclipse last year, this year's darkening of the moon won't be quite as obvious to the naked eye. National Geographic says you'll probably need binoculars or a telescope to see the Earth's shadow over the moon.

No, this year's event won't have that "holy cow" element of last year's super blood moon total eclipse — an event that was extremely rare and hadn't happened in over 30 years. But, considering Friday's eclipse is the last of its kind for another eight years, you should definitely spend some of your Friday looking up — or watching from home.

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Max Plenke

Max Plenke is a staff writer at Mic, where he covers breaking news, climate science, health and the future. His work has appeared in Esquire, GQ and Wallpaper. Send story tips to max@mic.com.

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