Report: Ahmad Rahami's father called his son a terrorist two years ago

Report: Ahmad Rahami's father called his son a terrorist two years ago
Source: AP
Source: AP

According to the New York Times, the father of Ahmad Rahami — the prime suspect in the recent explosions in New York City and New Jersey — told authorities his son was a terrorist in 2014, following Rahami's arrest for a domestic dispute during which he allegedly stabbed his brother.

At the time, the revelation spurred an FBI investigation into Rahami. However, an unnamed official told the Times they suspected Mohammad Rahami's accusation had been made out of anger toward his son.

"Two years ago I go to the FBI because my son was doing really bad, OK?" Mohammad Rahami said in a Tuesday interview, according to the Times. "But they check almost two months, they say, 'He's OK, he's clean, he's not a terrorist.' I say OK."

"Now they say he is a terrorist," he continued. "I say OK." 

The aftermath of an explosion in Chelsea that occurred Saturday night
Source: 
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

On Monday, when an NBC correspondent approached Mohammad Rahami — who was arriving on the scene of the Linden, New Jersey, shootout that resulted in his son's arrest — he said he had "no idea" his son allegedly had plans to set off bombs in NYC and New Jersey.

Rahami is slated to face five counts of attempted murder and two gun charges for his suspected crimes.  

Sept. 20, 2016, 12:54 p.m. Eastern: This story has been updated.

Correction: Sept. 20, 2016
A previous version of this story misidentified the title of the NBC correspondent who interviewed Mohammad Rahami in New Jersey. The reference has been updated.

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Marie Solis

Marie is a staff writer with a focus in feminist issues. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

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